Why there is NO FRUIT on my Tree?

Have a fruit tree that won’t bloom or bear fruit? Discover common issues and how to solve them, plus basic tree requirements for fruit production.

Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

Two commonly frustrating questions any grower might ask:

1. “Why won’t my fruit tree bloom?”
2. “Why doesn’t my tree have fruit?”

You’ve planted your fruit tree. It’s growing. It’s living. But it’s not blooming or bearing fruit. While this can be discouraging to the point of wanting to chop the tree down, go for the facts – not the axe.

Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

If your fruit tree doesn’t bloom or bear, it can happen for a number of reasons. In this article, we focus on the 6 basic requirements of fruit trees and address the most common issues and solutions related to fruit production.

1. Tree Development

If your fruit tree is still too young/immature, it won’t go into fruit-production mode. When you receive your tree, it will be around 1-2 years old and will still need a few years before reaching its fruiting maturity.

Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

There’s an old proverb that says, “The best time to plant a tree was 20 years ago. The second best time is now.”

2. Pollination

Fruit trees require pollination to be able to set fruit. If your tree is not self-pollinating, it needs a compatible pollinator tree planted nearby.

Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

Also, pollination-helping beneficials like bees, birds, and wind need to be adequately present. If your tree is missing these important elements, it may bloom, but it will not likely set fruit.

3. Hardiness Zones

Individual tree varieties have recommended hardiness zones for planting. Once you know what your zone is, you will be able to select fruit trees that are recommended to grow in your area.

Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

Things to Consider When Planting in Your Zone:

Trees should be hardy to your zone for a chance to survive winters and summers.

Trees should receive adequate chill hours to produce fruit.

Weather can greatly affect fruit production.

4. Pruning

Regularly pruned trees are much more apt to producing quality fruit. Fruiting buds tend to form on limbs that have adequate air circulation and light infiltration, which is your goal when pruning.

Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

You also have to make the right balance for pruning. Heavy over-pruning can cause a tree to produce too much vegetative growth in response, and under-pruning can lead to development of too much fruiting wood, which is the culprit for overbearing and fruit drop.

5. Spacing


Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

Fruit trees that are planted too close to one another will compete for nutrients and light. Make sure you give your trees enough room to grow and flourish.


Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

Dwarf fruit trees will grow 8-10 feet tall and wide,If you are limited on space then you can grow them in container too.Semi Dwarf Trees trees will reach 12-15 feet tall/wide. Standard fruit trees can reach 18-25+ feet tall/wide. so plant and pot them accordingingly.

6. Soil Conditions

It is very important that your trees have the right balance of reserve food and soil elements. This is the best thing you can do to ensure your tree fruits and has energy to support its fruit.

Buy Fruit Plants | Buy Fruit Seeds | Offers | Super Value Packs

As you can see in the graphic, if this balance is off, it can have a negative impact on how your tree blooms or bears.